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Food of the Day: Dough Doughnuts

Food of the Day: Dough Doughnuts


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Like no doughnut you’ve ever had

Once you try this doughnut, you can't look at others the same way.

On the corner of Franklin Avenue in Brooklyn, New York, I found what I call ‘the best doughnuts in the world.’

One might ask, how good can a doughnut really be? I mean, any doughnut from Dunkin’ Donuts and Krispy Kreme would do the job. And spending $2.25 on a doughnut is a bit much. Is it really worth it?

Undoubtedly, the answer is yes. While you stand in lane, the aroma of the doughnut store is a mix between sweet cupcakes and fresh baked bread. As you get closer and closer to the front, you can spot the variety of flavors. From the original glazed to the lemon with olive oil and thyme, you can’t go wrong no matter what you pick. I chose the Café au lait.

As I slowly began to expose the doughnut — given to me in a brown paper bag — I took notice of the sight and feel of this delicacy. The size is bigger than your average doughnut, and the pastry is covered in a light brown coffee glaze. To give the doughnut that extra crunch, walnut and cake crumbles are also sprinkled on top.

In just one bite I was mesmerized by the taste. The feathery doughnut had different layers of thin pastry dough that melted softly in my mouth with the sweet and sharp taste of coffee and crunchy crumbles.

Do you have a travel photo that you would like to share? A mouthwatering food or drink you know exactly where to get? Send over photos and tips to esaatela[at]thedailymeal.com.


American-style Doughnuts

A number of American foods have shown up on the Moroccan fusion food scene, including American-style doughnuts. Lighter and less dense than their French beignet counterparts, and more flavorful than traditional Moroccan sfenj, they're sure to delight family and guests at a Moroccan tea time or breakfast known as ftour.

For the best results, the dough must be sticky to the point of being a bit of a nuisance to knead. A heavy-duty mixer with a dough hook simplifies the kneading. Once the dough has risen, it will be easier to work with.

The doughnuts can be dusted with granulated or confectioners' sugar before serving, garnished with thin chocolate icing, or dipped in a light sugar glaze.


Montana Sourdough Doughnuts

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 cup sourdough starter (purchased or homemade)
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon melted lard or cooking oil
  • 4 1/2 cups sifted all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • Fat for frying

Procedure

Beat eggs and sugar together Add starter, buttermilk, lard, and sifted dry ingredients. Mix well. Turn out dough and knead on a lightly floured board until smooth. Roll to 1/2-inch thickness and cut with 2 3/4-inch doughnut cutter. Put on a greased cookie sheet and let rise for 30 minutes. Fry in hot deep fat (370 degrees F) until golden brown and done. Roll in sugar. Makes about 3 dozen.

Thank's For Reading Montana sourdough doughnuts Easy Recipes


Homemade Doughnut Recipe

Description

This delicious doughnut recipe is versatile & simple. Doughnuts rise in the refrigerator overnight. All you have to do in the morning is cook them.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole milk, at room temperature, between 75 and 85 degrees
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 3½ tsp active dry yeast
  • 1 large egg + 1 large egg yolk, slightly beaten
  • 6 tbsp butter, melted and cooled to room temperature
  • 1 tbsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp finely grated lemon zest
  • 6 cups unbleached, all purpose flour
  • 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 2 tsp salt
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

*NOTE: This recipe makes approximately 24 doughnuts that are 3 1/2 inches in diameter. The recipe will make more or less depending on the size of your doughnuts.

MAKE THE DOUGH:

  1. Pour the milk into the bowl of a standing mixer, and sprinkle in the sugar and yeast. Stir to combine and then let sit for about 5 minutes to let the yeast begin to come alive. Whisk in the egg, egg yolk, melted butter, vanilla and lemon zest.
  2. Fit your mixer with the dough hook, add 5 cups of the all-purpose flour and mix on low speed (speed number 2) until the dough begins to come together. Slowly add enough of the remaining cup of flour so that the dough comes together into a soft, slightly sticky ball. Depending on the humidity in the air, this might take the entire remaining cup or only a bit of it. What you’re looking for is a soft, smooth ball of dough that clings to the dough hook, and does not stick to the sides of the bowl, but does stick slightly to the bottom of the bowl. If you stop the mixer and touch the dough, it should feel slightly sticky, but not so wet as to be confused with cookie dough.
  3. Once the dough has come together, sprinkle in the nutmeg and salt. Continue to kneed in the mixer for about 8-10 minutes. The dough should look very soft and smooth.
  4. Butter a large bowl and dump the dough into the bowl. Butter a piece plastic wrap (or spray with non-stick spray) and use it to cover the bowl. Let the dough rise at room temperature for 1-2 hours, until the dough has doubled in size.
  5. While the dough rises cut out 24 squares of parchment paper, each square about 1-inch larger on all sides than the cutter you will be using to cut out the doughnuts. (This is unnecessary if you are only making doughnut holes. For doughnut holes, simply cover a baking sheet with parchment paper.)
  6. Set 2 baking sheets out on the counter. After the dough has risen, dump it out of the bowl onto a clean countertop and roll out to 1/2 inch thick. Cut out the doughnuts using a dough cutter. Place each doughnut on one of the individual squares of parchment paper and lay it on a baking sheet. Continue to roll out the scraps and cut doughnuts from the dough until you’ve used all the dough.
  7. Spray sheets of plastic wrap with non-stick spray and cover the doughnuts. At this point you can leave the doughnuts on the counter to rise for about 1 hour before frying, OR you can place the doughnuts in the refrigerator to let rise overnight. If refrigerating the dough, let rest at room temperature for 1 hour before frying.

FRY THE DOUGHNUTS:

*NOTE: Several different factors can affect frying temperature. I suggest cooking one “test” doughnut in your hot oil before proceeding with the rest. If your test doughnut is overdone on the outside and undercooked on the inside, lower the oil temperature a bit. If your test doughnut is overly greasy and heavy from having absorbed too much oil, raise the oil temperature.

  1. Pour enough vegetable oil into a large, deep saucepan to come up the sides 3 or 4 inches. Heat the oil to 370 – 375 degrees.
  2. Place 2 or 3 of the doughnuts into the hot oil, parchment and all. Immediately after lowering them into the hot oil, use a pair of kitchen tongs to remove the parchment. Let the doughnuts cook in the hot oil until the bottom is a deep golden brown, 3-5 minutes.
  3. Using a slotted spoon, gently flip the doughnuts over in the oil and cook another 3-5 minutes until both sides are golden brown. Using the slotted spoon, transfer the doughnuts to paper towels to drain. Do your best to keep the temperature of the oil between 360-370 degrees.

If coating the doughnuts in sugar, let the doughnuts rest on the paper towel for 10-20 seconds and then roll in sugar to coat (a sprinkle or two of ground nutmeg mixed into the sugar is a nice touch).

If glazing the doughnuts, let drain on paper towels for at least 10 minutes before dipping in glaze.

If filling the doughnuts with pastry cream let cool completely before filling. Scoop pastry cream into a pastry bag fitted with a large round tip. Use the tip to puncture the bottom or the side of the doughnuts and squeeze some pastry cream into the center of the doughnuts.

Keywords: homemade doughnuts, yeast raised doughnuts, glazed doughnuts, cream filled doughnuts, overnight doughnuts, donuts


Ingredients

    • 1 package (2 1/2 teaspoons) active dry yeast or 2/3 ounce (18 grams) fresh cake yeast
    • 2/3 cup (160 grams) milk, at room temperature
    • 3 1/2 cups (490 grams) unbleached all-purpose flour
    • 1 1/3 cups (270 grams) sugar
    • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
    • 3 eggs
    • 7 tablespoons (3/4 stick/100 grams) butter, at room temperature, cut into 6 to 8 pieces
    • Canola oil, for frying
  1. Vanilla Cream Filling
    • 6 tablespoons (90 grams) heavy cream , chilled

Preparation

    1. In a medium bowl, combine 1 tablespoon of the yeast with 3/4 cup of the warm milk and stir to dissolve the yeast. Add 3/4 cup of the flour and stir to create a smooth paste. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the flour mixture rest in a warm place for 30 minutes.
    2. Once 30 minutes have passed, in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the remaining 1 teaspoon yeast with the remaining 1/4 cup milk (the milk will be room temperature at this point). Add the rested flour mixture along with the vanilla and egg yolks and mix on low until the ingredients are incorporated and the dough is smooth, about 30 seconds. Turn off the mixer and add 1 cup of flour, along with the sugar and salt. Mix on medium until the dough starts to come together, about 30 seconds. Add the butter and mix on medium until it's incorporated, about 30 seconds.
    3. Remove the paddle attachment from the mixer, and switch to the dough hook. Start adding the remaining flour, 1/4 cup at a time (turning the mixer off for each addition) and knead the dough on medium until it completely pulls away from the side of the bowl and is smooth and not too sticky, about 1 minute. The dough will be very soft and moist but not so sticky that you can't roll it out. (For this step, you may only need to use as little as 1/4 cup flour, so there may be flour leftover.) Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rest in a warm place for 30 minutes.
    4. Once 30 minutes have passed, gently press down on the dough to remove any gas bubbles then chill, covered, for at least 1 hour and up to 12 hours.
    5. When ready to roll out the dough, line a baking sheet with a lightly floured non-terry towel. Lightly flour a work surface and roll out the dough to a 1/2-inch thickness. Using doughnut or cookie cutters, cut out 3-inch-diameter rounds with 1-inch-diameter holes. (For filled doughnuts, don't cut out the holes.) Arrange the doughnuts on the prepared baking sheet, leaving at least 1 inch between doughnuts. Cover the doughnuts loosely with plastic wrap and let them proof in a warm place until almost doubled in size, 30 to 40 minutes. Check to see if the doughnuts are ready every 5 to 10 minutes. To test, use a fingertip to lightly touch one of the doughnuts. If the dough springs back immediately, it needs more time if it springs back slowly, it's ready and if the dough doesn't spring back at all, it's over-proofed. You can punch down and reroll over-proofed dough once.
    6. While the doughnuts are proofing, line a baking sheet with 2 layers of paper towels and place a wire rack on top of the towels. In a heavy-bottomed large pot or deep fryer, heat at least 2 inches of oil until a deep-fry thermometer registers 360°F. Working in batches, use a slotted metal spoon or spatula to carefully place the doughnuts in the hot oil. Fry, flipping once, until light golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes per side. Transfer as done to the wire rack and return the oil to 360°F between batches. Let the doughnuts cool slightly before glazing with the Basic Sugar Glaze or Chocolate Glaze .

    Yum. Doughnuts!

    1. Make sure milk is nice and warm, but not overly hot.
    2. Add sugar to milk. Stir to dissolve.
    3. Add yeast into a small bowl.
    4. Pour milk/sugar mixture over yeast. Stir gently, then let sit for 10 minutes.
    5. Melt butter in separate bowl until butter is almost melted. Stir to finish melting so butter won't be overly hot.
    6. Add beaten eggs to melted butter, stirring constantly to make sure the butter's not too hot for the eggs.
    7. Add the egg/butter mixture to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook.
    8. With the mixer on 3 or medium-low speed, pour in the yeast mixture.
    9. Allow the dough hook to stir this mixture for a couple of minutes, making sure it's thoroughly combined.
    10. With the mixer still going, add helpings of the flour mixture in 1/4 to 1/2 cup increments until all the flour is gone.
    11. Stop the mixer, scrape the bowl, then turn the mixer on the same speed for five whole minutes.
    12. After five minutes, stop the mixer and scrape the bottom of the bowl.
    13. Turn on the mixer for 30 seconds.
    14. Turn off the mixer and allow the dough to sit in the bowl undisturbed for 10 minutes.
    15. After 10 minutes, transfer dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Toss the dough to coat, then cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place straight in the fridge.
    16. Refrigerate dough for at least 8 hours, or overnight.

    1. Remove bowl from fridge and turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface.
    2. Roll out to 1/4 to 1/3-inch thickness.
    3. Using a 3-inch cutter, cut as many rounds as you can, then roll out remaining dough and cut as much as you can, etc.
    4. Cut holes out of each round using a 1 1/2-inch cutter.
    5. Place both doughnuts and holes on a floured baking sheet.
    6. Cover with large tea towel and place in a warm place in your kitchen my kitchen is very drafty, so I have to briefly warm the griddle, then turn it off and set the sheets on top to keep warm.
    7. Allow doughnuts to rise undisturbed for at least 1 hour 1 hour 15 minutes if necessary. Doughuts should be visibly puffier and appear to be airy.

    1. Heat plenty of vegetable shortening in a large pot until the temperature reaches 375 to 380 degrees---do not let it get hotter than 380 degrees! 375 is ideal keep the thermometer in the pan to continually monitor.
    2. One to two at a time, gently grab doughnuts and ease them into the hot oil. Allow them to cook 1 minute on each side they will brown very quickly.
    3. Remove doughnuts from the oil with a slotted spoon, allowing all oil to drip off.
    4. Place doughnut immediately on several layers of paper towels. Count to five, then flip it over onto a clean part of the paper towels. Count to five, then flip it over again the purpose, obviously, is to drain as much grease as possible before it soaks into the doughnut.
    5. Repeat with remaining doughnuts and holes. The holes will cook more quickly than the doughnuts about 30 seconds per side.
    6. Allow doughnuts to slightly cool.

    1. Mix all glaze ingredients in a bowl until completely smooth.
    2. One by one, dip doughnuts into the glaze until halfway submerged. (Note: completely submerge doughnut holes, then remove with slotted spoon.)
    4. Remove from glaze, then turn right side up on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet (to catch dripping glaze.)
    5. Serve warm if possible, or room temperature.


    Traditional Polish Pączki (Doughnuts)

    This traditional recipe for Polish pączki (POHNCH-kee), or doughnuts, is a splurge food before Lent fasting begins.

    In the United States, Fat Tuesday, also known as Shrove Tuesday, Mardi Gras, and Pączki Day, is the day to indulge before Lent begins. However, Fat Thursday (the last Thursday before Lent) heralds the winding down of Carnival season, and that's when fried foods such as pączki are eaten with abandon in Poland, where it's known as Tłusty Czwartek.

    Making them was a way to use up ingredients such as butter, sugar, eggs, fruit, and lard before the dietary restraints of Lent started, in order to avoid food waste. Some accounts say these fried foods date all the way back to the Middle Ages, but immigrants have brought this tradition with them to places such as the United States, where many communities still make them.

    These fried rounds of yeast dough are typically stuffed with rose hip, prune, apricot, strawberry, raspberry, or sweet cheese filling. Some people make these puffy doughballs without a filling and roll them in granulated sugar, which is equally delicious. Whichever way you make them, keep in mind that pączki differ from regular doughnuts insofar as these Polish treats are sweeter and richer.

    As with any baking project, make sure the butter and eggs are at room temperature for best results. Use a neutral-flavored oil to deep-fry doughnuts. Canola oil, peanut oil, generic vegetable oil, and high-heat safflower oil are excellent choices.


    Homemade Glazed Doughnuts

    1. Make sure milk is nice and warm, but not overly hot.
    2. Add sugar to milk. Stir to dissolve.
    3. Add yeast into a small bowl.
    4. Pour milk/sugar mixture over yeast. Stir gently, then let sit for 10 minutes.
    5. Melt butter in separate bowl until butter is almost melted. Stir to finish melting so butter won't be overly hot.
    6. Add beaten eggs to melted butter, stirring constantly to make sure the butter's not too hot for the eggs.
    7. Add the egg/butter mixture to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook.
    8. With the mixer on 3 or medium-low speed, pour in the yeast mixture.
    9. Allow the dough hook to stir this mixture for a couple of minutes, making sure it's thoroughly combined.
    10. With the mixer still going, add helpings of the flour mixture in 1/4 to 1/2 cup increments until all the flour is gone.
    11. Stop the mixer, scrape the bowl, then turn the mixer on the same speed for five whole minutes.
    12. After five minutes, stop the mixer and scrape the bottom of the bowl.
    13. Turn on the mixer for 30 seconds.
    14. Turn off the mixer and allow the dough to sit in the bowl undisturbed for 10 minutes.
    15. After 10 minutes, transfer dough to a lightly oiled bowl. Toss the dough to coat, then cover the bowl with plastic wrap and place straight in the fridge.
    16. Refrigerate dough for at least 8 hours, or overnight.

    1. Remove bowl from fridge and turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface.
    2. Roll out to 1/4 to 1/3-inch thickness.
    3. Using a 3-inch cutter, cut as many rounds as you can, then roll out remaining dough and cut as much as you can, etc.
    4. Cut holes out of each round using a 1 1/2-inch cutter.
    5. Place both doughnuts and holes on a floured baking sheet.
    6. Cover with large tea towel and place in a warm place in your kitchen my kitchen is very drafty, so I have to briefly warm the griddle, then turn it off and set the sheets on top to keep warm.
    7. Allow doughnuts to rise undisturbed for at least 1 hour 1 hour 15 minutes if necessary. Doughuts should be visibly puffier and appear to be airy.

    1. Heat plenty of vegetable shortening in a large pot until the temperature reaches 375 to 380 degrees---do not let it get hotter than 380 degrees! 375 is ideal keep the thermometer in the pan to continually monitor.
    2. One to two at a time, gently grab doughnuts and ease them into the hot oil. Allow them to cook 1 minute on each side they will brown very quickly.
    3. Remove doughnuts from the oil with a slotted spoon, allowing all oil to drip off.
    4. Place doughnut immediately on several layers of paper towels. Count to five, then flip it over onto a clean part of the paper towels. Count to five, then flip it over again the purpose, obviously, is to drain as much grease as possible before it soaks into the doughnut.
    5. Repeat with remaining doughnuts and holes. The holes will cook more quickly than the doughnuts about 30 seconds per side.
    6. Allow doughnuts to slightly cool.

    1. Mix all glaze ingredients in a bowl until completely smooth.
    2. One by one, dip doughnuts into the glaze until halfway submerged. (Note: completely submerge doughnut holes, then remove with slotted spoon.)
    4. Remove from glaze, then turn right side up on a cooling rack over a cookie sheet (to catch dripping glaze.)
    5. Serve warm if possible, or room temperature.


    Seasonal Doughnut Flavors

    Our classic beignet filled with seasonal jam. Flavors include Strawberry, Raspberry, Peach, & Apricot. Call us to find out what we have in store that day.

    Cream cheese frosting flavored with a hint of orange zest and pure vanilla extract dusted with a graham cracker topping

    With Candied Blood Orange Slice

    Irish Coffee Cream Filled

    White Chocolate Raspberry

    Chocolate & Mint Brownie Cake Doughnut

    Our brownie cake doughnut glazed with a mint glaze

    Peanut Butter Chocolate Doughnut

    With Honey Roasted Peanuts

    A soft, fluffy beignet filled with coconut pastry cream, covered in coconut glaze with toasted coconut flakes

    Dough's delectable version of a Hot Cross Bun. This doughnut dough flavored with nutmeg, allspice and cinnamon and raisins. Fried like a traditional doughnut, filled with vanilla pastry cream and covered in plain glaze and topped with a traditional cross.

    Pumpkin with Salted Pumpkin Seeds

    White Chocolate Peppermint

    Key Lime Pie glazed fluffy doughnut topped with toasted marshmallow and graham cracker crumbs

    We&rsquove spent almost a year on development and we&rsquore very excited to finally introduce you to our new plant based doughnuts! Everything you know and love about Dough Doughnuts. light, fluffy, and that hint of nutmeg without the dairy and eggs! Look out for that new shape, available in Plain, Cinnamon and Hibiscus.



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