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Crazy Behavior at the Grocery Store

Crazy Behavior at the Grocery Store


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Recent stories highlighting bizarre situations involving people shopping for food.

Grocery stores are generally regarded as being relatively neutral as far are public places go. For the most part, people tend to keep to themselves while shopping for food, right? But lately, grocery stores nationwide have turned out to be the unexpected location for bizarre conflicts. While one of these recent situations is purposely humorous, the other has spurred legal action.

• Whole Foods Hip Hop: Creative music collective Fog and Smog has recently released a rap video that mocks Whole Foods and many of its customers. The video pokes fun at various things like the grocery chain’s small carts and high prices.

• Fighting in Trader Joe’s: An altercation that took place at a Trader Joe’s located on the Upper West Side of New York City this past January is being tried in criminal court this week. After a teenager grabbed a package of frozen vegan pad Thai with tofu before another customer, the incident led to an escalated argument resulting in one woman slapping the other woman across the cheek.

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


8 Rude Things You Do at the Farmers' Market, According to the Vendors Themselves

I saw it coming from a mile away. Okay, that&aposs an exaggeration. It was from a foot away. The young mother was inspecting my table filled with the jams and salsas that I made with the fruit from my fourteen mango trees. Her one-year-old baby, who she was holding, was clearly teething, gnawing on his fist and drooling profusely. As she leaned over, so did the baby, whose saliva began to drip in one long stream — straight into my sample bowl of vanilla-lime-infused mango jam. Then, to finish it off, he dunked his fist into it, sending sticky mango flying everywhere.

That comment was the most I received from the mother, who laughed at her child&aposs antics. Even though he licked his fist with gusto, she didn&apost bother to buy a jar. As she moved on to the next booth and I cleaned up the mess, I thought how fortunate we all were that I hadn&apost been sampling the Scotch bonnet pepper flavor.

1. You contaminate the samples

Treating samples without respect for sanitary practices is a common theme at farmers&apos markets, both before and during the pandemic, says Anna Rider, a food writer and recipe developer at GarlicDelight.com. When she sells pasta and sauces at a farmers&apos market in the San Francisco Bay Area, she provides samples of the cooked pasta with sauce on a tray, which is, of course, a great way to attract attention from potential customers. But to do this, she says, you have to follow certain safety guidelines. For instance, food has to be covered and served in disposable containers.

Furthermore, once someone touches a sample, that item has to be removed. This is why you should be careful to take only the sample you&aposre going to eat, she emphasizes, and then throw away the remains. "One customer took a sample, walked away with it, and then came back to put the sample back on the tray," she says. "She proceeded to touch every sample and then pick another one and walked away with it. This was terrible because I had to throw out all the samples since she had touched them. This is definitely a no-no during COVID-19 as most vendors aren&apost even providing samples for safety and hygiene reasons."

2. You manhandle the food

Writer and cheesemonger Alexandra Jones, who ran a farm stand for two years and sold artisan cheese at a farmers&apos market in Philadelphia for four years, had a similar experience with a woman "who insisted on &aposmuscle testing&apos every piece of the cheese," she says. "She wanted to pick the one that was &aposbest&apos for her." (Muscle testing is an alternative healing theory that purports to allow our subconscious mind to make decisions for us.) Jones also has far too much experience with "anyone who lets their dogs jump up on my samples or grown adults who just dive into samples with their bare hands even though multiple containers of toothpicks are right there."

3. Your kids touch — or lick — everything

Contaminated samples and mishandled products are just two irritations for those of us who have worked or continue to man a booth at farmers&apos markets. Children who believe produce should be tossed like sports equipment is another. Farmers&apos markets, which usually take place on the weekends (pre-pandemic and, depending on the state, during the pandemic) are family affairs. Vendors understand this and welcome everyone. But if your child accidentally ruins a sample or product by tainting it in any way — I&aposve also seen a kid lick a piece of fruit like a lollipop — you should, at the very least, purchase it.

4. You squeeze and bruise the goods

Shelby DeVore, the founder of Farminence who also managed a commercial greenhouse for years, says, "I don&apost know how many times customers will pick up produce to squeeze, smell, or poke it to see how ripe it is, only to damage it and then set it back down." She also adds that many of the so-called tricks that people use to try and tell when something is ripe just aren&apost true. "You risk bruising the produce more than anything."


Watch the video: : Ουρές στο κοινωνικό παντοπωλείο (May 2022).